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Rover Field Reports from Mars

Status Reports for Perseverance rover at Jezero Crater Mars

 

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L. Crumpler, Perseverance Science Team & New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science

The Perseverance rover Science Team will be working remotely during the early mission. Below is a brief field report summary of its latest activity.

As the Perseverance interplanetary cruise stage approaches Mars, the planet appears to grow in size, were you able to see it from the spacecraft. Over previous months Mars was just a dot in the sky from the perspective of the cruise stage. But in the past few weeks Mars has "grown" in size at an alarming rate. As of today, February 15, 2021, just three days from landing on Mars, the planet appears as big as the full Moon does from Earth.


 


Archived Reports


Sol 4410 - Mon, June 20, 2016

Opportunity is finishing up its activities here in Marathon Valley on the western rim of the 22 km-diameter Endeavour impact crater.  Over the past few weeks it has been “walking” along a ridge inspecting the outcrops. From orbit this location was spied as containing significant clay minerals, so the rocks here have been studied carefully.

Part of the western rim of Endeavour showing the traverse thus far.

Sol 4365 - Thursday, May 5, 2016

Sol 4270 – January 28, 2016

Sol 4119 - August 26, 2015

Opportunity is back in communication after the two-week blackout of solar conjunction. We will be cleaning up activities here where Opportunity is sitting on the edge of a feature known as “Spirit of Saint Louis crater.”

Sol  4039 - Two Week Period of Solar Conjunction Begins

Since my last post Opportunity has successfully driven from the summit of Cape Tribulation (the name we gave the highest point on the rim). The goal has been to arrive at a deep notch or valley ("Marathon Valley") in the crater rim by about March 15. Remote sensing from the orbiting Mars Reconnaissance Obiter (MRO) has shown that some spectacular exposures of weathered and altered minerals should be exposed there. That is always a clue that it is geologically very interesting in more than just minerals and chemistry.

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